‘The most delicious sandwich ever’: French diner gives its verdict on the world’s most delicious sandwiches

France’s national sandwich, the French sandwich, is a sandwich that is more than just a sandwich.

It’s a thing, a whole cuisine, and the result is an epic meal.

But in the UK it’s one of the most sought-after things to order in restaurants.

This week, we asked some of the world-class food experts at BBC News to weigh in on the sandwich’s place in our pantry.

The experts weigh in with their thoughts on the UK’s most-prestigious sandwich and the UK food scene in general. 

The sandwich’s origins The sandwich’s origin is a simple one: the French were the first to create a sandwich called a billet, a short, round, flat bread.

This bread was rolled up, and served on top of a large piece of bacon, which was then sliced and fried, and added to a second roll.

The sandwich was then baked and served with a hot sauce, but it wasn’t until the mid-19th century that the sandwich truly became a global sensation.

The first sandwich to be created by the French in the USA was the Croissant, a French pastry filled with French cheese.

This was the first of many sandwiches to be invented by the British.

But it was the French that really created the UK sandwich.

The French were inspired by the Italian baguette, which is made with a combination of eggs, cheese, and flour.

The British were inspired to try their hand at making sandwiches by their French cousins, who came up with the Bébé sandwich, which featured a tomato, onions, cheese and bacon, and a slice of bacon.

These two flavours combined in a bread were the basis of the French word for sandwich, bébère, which translates roughly to “stomach-satisfying sandwich”. 

“In the UK, the B&B is still the UKs favourite sandwich,” says Mark Maitland, who is the food editor at The Daily Telegraph.

“I remember the first B&b I had was the Crusty B&ab sandwich, where I had bacon and onion in a bun with a tomato and cucumber on a brioche.

The B&B is the classic sandwich of Britain and in my mind, the UK has a very rich history of béberes.”

Mark Mraitland, The Daily Mirror, food editor The best sandwich?

The sandwich has been around for more than 200 years.

According to Mark Maser, a British chef who also owns his own b&”b&amp.;b sandwich restaurant in London, the first British sandwich to truly gain international recognition was the Bouchon de Boulangerie.

“In 1874, the British had introduced the boulange, which they called the Boulange du Brînerie, and that was the sandwich that would be so popular.” “

It was made with butter and eggs and it was very popular,” Mark explains.

“In 1874, the British had introduced the boulange, which they called the Boulange du Brînerie, and that was the sandwich that would be so popular.” 

Bouchon was one of Britains first sandwiches and was popular at the time, but its popularity soon dwindled as a result of poor food hygiene and bad service.

“Bouchons first introduction was at the Royal Hospital Hospital in Birmingham in 1877,” Mark says.

“So, as we started to expand, people were coming here, but also they were coming in for treatment, and for medical reasons. “

“That B&ambre Bouchone was introduced in 1886 and was one the sandwiches that really grabbed the British public’s attention.” “

Today, the best British sandwiches have their origins in France, with the first sandwich being the Bouillon, a very salty, fatty sandwich. “

That B&ambre Bouchone was introduced in 1886 and was one the sandwiches that really grabbed the British public’s attention.” 

Today, the best British sandwiches have their origins in France, with the first sandwich being the Bouillon, a very salty, fatty sandwich.

In the US, the bouillon is a thick, salty sandwich made with an egg, cheese or sour cream filling. 

But, if you’re thinking about going out to a boulage for the first time, then the best sandwiches are likely to be in France.

The bouillons first appearance in Britain is the Bicardière, a simple sandwich made of bread, ham and sausage.

The best bicardières were made in France in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, when people travelled around Europe in order to find bread, and bread to eat. 

In the 19th century, bread was becoming a scarce commodity in Britain, so many people travelled to England and Wales in order the bread they needed to survive.

These journeys were often dangerous and dangerous for the travellers, as they often ended up with wounds from the rough weather.